VISIT US

Relax, reflect, remember

Swan Point Cemetery is considered to be one of the foremost garden cemeteries in the United States. Although it is private and exists primarily as a resting place for the deceased, Swan Point is also a community resource. We welcome you to visit our historic administration building, our chapels, our mausolea, our columbaria. Walk the peaceful paths and lanes that cross our rolling terrain. Observe the care we take to make this a sanctuary, a haven, a place for quiet reflection and reminiscences.

Guidelines for Visiting

Visitors are most welcome here and should feel free to walk, slowly bicycle, or drive around the estate. We ask that visitors, at all times, wear proper attire, including shirts and footwear, and respect the solemnity of our chapels and interment site services. Pet walking, skiing, fast bicycling, skateboarding or rollerblading are not allowed. Jogging and fast walking are acceptable between 8:00am and 9:00am but, for safety reasons, no earphones may be worn at any time. For more information about the use of our facilities, please stop by the office located in the administration building.
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kiosk

Locate an Interment Site

Visitors searching for the interment site of a family member or friend interred at Swan Point Cemetery will find our Interment Site Locator Computer Kiosk to be a helpful tool. Located in the vestibule of our administration building, the self-serve, user-friendly touch screen system allows visitors to search by name and displays interment locations on a detailed, printable map of the cemetery.
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lownes-angel-monument Lownes Angel Monument
The Lownes Angel Monument features a fine bronze sculpture by Isidore Konti (1862 -1938), a Viennese-born artist who studied at that city’s Imperial Academy. He came to the United States in 1890 to work on decorations at Chicago’s World’s Columbian Exposition (1893), established a studio in New York, and regularly exhibited at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts; his work is in the collection of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. Edgar John Lownes (1870-1924) was a textile manufacturer with strong ties to the design and music communities. His wife, Terèse Kaffenburg (1877-1970), presented at court before Queen Victoria, became an early advocate for women’s suffrage; an accomplished pianist and soprano, she married, after Lownes’s death, Dr. Eugene A. Noble, the first president of New York’s Julliard School of Music. Given the Lownes’ interest in cultural activity, their selection of a well-known sculptor is not surprising.

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nightingale-angel-monumentNightingale Angel Monument
This life-size statue is a particularly beautiful example of the funeral art typical at the turn-of-the-century.

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Sayles Lot
The Sayles Lot reflects the late nineteenth century interest in the customs and art of Italy, Greece and Rome. A statue derived from Michelangelo’s funerary sculpture of Lorenzo de Medici is one of its distinctive features.

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Rock Pond Fountain
In 1878, a large boulder was positioned in the pond and supplied with water to make the Rock Pond Fountain.

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the-ellipse
Ellipse
In the historic core of the cemetery, The Ellipse is a designated area for “green” or natural burials, a process by which all components going into the earth are biodegradable.

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J.B. Barnaby Monument
The Barnaby Monument is one of the tallest and most well recognized of the monuments in the Cemetery.

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Italian Marble Fountain
A white marble pedestal fountain was imported from Italy in the early part of the 20th century.

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Memorial Grove Garden
With Megalith guarded by an ancient stone Megalith, the Memorial Grove Garden offers a preserve for the scattering of cremated remains.

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Pastor’s Rest Monument
The First Unitarian Society Grounds contain The Pastor’s Rest Monument, dedicated to honoring the final resting place of clergy and their families.

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Grosvenor Lot
The Grosvenor family plot contains several elaborately carved late nineteenth century monuments.

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Stranger’s Rest
This rustic gazebo is a replica of one dedicated to the memory of Benjamin Anthony by his wife, Sarah W. Anthony. Erected in 1885 near Benjamin Anthony’s burial lot, the shelter is a unique feature in the cemetery landscape, combining utility and comfort with novelty and beauty of deign.

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Hope Memorial Garden
The Hope Memorial Garden features a sculpture integrating a 1700’s-era anchor, recovered from Narragansett Bay, centered against two large triangular rocks carved from local granite.

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The Dell
A small pond created in 1886, The Dell has been restored to its original beauty using well water for the fountain.

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Redwood Complex
The Redwood complex is designed in a variation of English Country Gothic and Arts and Crafts Movement styles to blend harmoniously with earlier cemetery buildings.

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Trolley Shelter
In 1903, the Butler Avenue trolley line was extended down Blackstone Boulevard and a fieldstone structure was erected opposite the cemetery entrance.

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Japanese Zelkova

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White Ash

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Cucumber Tree Magnolia

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Sassafras

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Weeping Hemlock

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Tulip Tree

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Hinoki Falsecypress

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Black Locust

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Weeping High Cherry

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Eastern Dogwood

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Chinese Toontree

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European Spindle Tree

From Boston
Take I-95 south to Pawtucket. Take Exit 27. At end of ramp turn left, go two blocks to fork and bear left. Go .8 miles to Blackstone Boulevard and turn left. Swan Point Cemetery’s entrance is the second left across the Boulevard

From Hartford
Take Rte. 6 to I-195 east to I-95 south to I-195 east. Take the third exit, Exit 3, Gano Street. At end of ramp turn right onto Gano Street. Go north to Waterman Street and turn right. At second light, turn left onto Butler Avenue. Butler becomes Blackstone Boulevard. Swan Point Cemetery’s entrance is 1.7 miles on the right.

From Worcester
Take Rte. 146 south to I-95 south to I-195 east. Take the third exit, Exit 3, Gano Street. At end of ramp turn right onto Gano Street. Go north to Waterman Street and turn right. At second light, turn left onto Butler Avenue. Butler becomes Blackstone Boulevard. Swan Point Cemetery’s entrance is 1.7 miles on the right.

From Fall River/New Bedford
Take I-195 west to Exit 3, Gano Street. At end of ramp turn right onto Gano Street. Go north to Waterman Street and turn right. At second light, turn left onto Butler Avenue. Butler becomes Blackstone Boulevard. Swan Point Cemetery’s entrance is 1.7 miles on the right.

From New York
Take I-95 north to I-195 east. Take the third exit, Exit 3, Gano Street. At end of ramp turn right onto Gano Street. Go north to Waterman Street and turn right. At second light, turn left onto Butler Avenue. Butler becomes Blackstone Boulevard. Swan Point Cemetery’s entrance is 1.7 miles on the right.

© 2021 Swan Point Cemetery